Pecking order: how John Gould dined out on the birds of Australia

No doubt. Still it is ironic that: “A conservationist, despite his propensity to shoot everything from wandering albatross to emu wrens, Gould lamented the loss of species as a result of the white man’s invasion.”

> On 31 Dec 2017, at 9:31 pm, Brian Fleming < flambeau@labyrinth.net.au> wrote:
>
> I think it hardly surprising that early collectors ate their specimens after skinning them! They were camping out, often with limited supplies, and fresh meat was very welcome. Not just birds either. Gould writes with great feeling of the excellence of a large Red Kangaroo which sustained his whole party when they had run out of food in South Australia.
>
> Anthea Fleming
>
>
> On 31/12/2017 10:19 PM, Laurie Knight wrote:
>> Early ornithologists like to eat their subjects – see
>>
www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/dec/30/pecking-order-how-john-gould-dined-out-on-the-birds-of-australia
>>


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