Birding-Aus Digest, Vol 68, Issue 7

Hi Paul, Mike,
Thanks for your input to the discussion. I feel more confident Birdata is the most logical/useful place to enter standardised survey data with the intention of furthering bird conservation. Looking forward to the interface updates!
If anyone is interested in the paper Paul mentioned, the full version is available for free here: https://www.csu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/76056/Watson_1308.pdf
Cheers,
Jack
———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Paul Sullivan <paul.sullivan@birdlife.org.au>
To: "birding-aus@birding-aus.org" <birding-aus@birding-aus.org>
Cc: 
Bcc: 
Date: Thu, 6 Jun 2019 09:09:33 +0000
Subject: [Birding-Aus] eBird or Birdata (Jack Worcester)

Firstly thank you Jack for submitting standardised surveys into birdata. It really does help BirdLife Australia run State of Birds reports and indices which inform bird conservation priorities and decisions:
birdata and eBird are complementary in a country with such a large land mass and low population density, except for our cities.
You can read a recent paper about the science of ‘big data’ and standardised bird surveys here:
The birdata interface is being updated with new user features but if you prefer using eBird you can still submit standardised surveys:
I hope that helps. 
Paul Sullivan
BirdLife

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Mike Grigg <mikesgrigg@gmail.com>
To: birding-aus@birding-aus.org
Cc: 
Bcc: 
Date: Thu, 6 Jun 2019 18:13:24 +1000
Subject: [Birding-Aus] eBird vs Birdata

Hi Jack
eBird is in some ways more user friendly but Birdata is the national bird database and entering bird survey data conforming with birdata methodologies is the scientific way to go.  The data can then be used in a variety of ways by Birdlife Australia (our national birding organisaation) for research i.e. compilation of the State of Australia’s Birds and the Atlas program  (see Atlas and Birdata on the Birdlife.org.au webpage).
Cheers
Mike

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