Australian splits

Just to stick my neck out and speaking of future splits, surely the Grey
Shrike-thrush in the Red Centre should be split just on the basis of its
song – nothing like that of the east coast species. I heard them singing
at Kata Tjuta in June 2003 and again at Kings Canyon – pure silvery call
that reminded me of the Andean Solitaire Thrush heard on a walk at the
Tandayapa Lodge in Ecuador April 2001.

Penny, Gloucester, NSW

On 3/05/2018 2:46 PM, Graeme Chapman wrote:
> I used to think that the Sandstone Shrike-thrush was pretty hard to beat, but when the Little Shrike-thrush was recently re-instated as a full species, when I changed the listing on my website my attention was drawn to what an outstanding songster it is.
>
> So my vote goes to a Little Shrike-thrush with Pied Butcherbird a close second.
>
> You can listen to them easily on my website ( www.graemechapman.com.au) but to properly appreciate these songs, listen through a good speaker – don’t waste your time on a phone or an iPod.
>
> No doubt there will be all sorts of opinions and who knows, someone might come up with something we have never suspected.
>
> Not easy I know to compare songs like these that are loud and in your face so to speak with something like a songlark.
>
> I’m not counting mimicry so that leaves out lyrebirds – that could be another subject!
>
> Cheers
>
> Graeme Chapman
>
>
>


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